Project Report Roasted, Dried, Salted Sunflower Seed

Project Report of Packaged Drinking Water Based Industries

Project Report of Steel, Stainless Steel, Non Ferrous Metals

Project Report of Gum, Adhesives & Sealants Technology Books

Project Report of Cosmetic Technology

Project Report of Building Materials & Chemicals

Project Report of Export Oriented Industries

Project Report of Printing, Screen Printing & Packaging

Project Report of Plastic Processing, Compounding

Project Report of Paint, Varnish, Coating and Solvent

Project Report of Soap, Detergents, Cosmetics

Project Report of Paint, Varnish, Solvent, Thinner

Project Report of Bakery and Confectionery Products

Project Report of Chemicals, Dyes, Petrochemicals

Project Report of Cold Storage Unit

Project Report of Dairy Farm, Milk Processing

Project Report of Essential Oils, Flavors

Project Report of Fish Farming & Fishery Products

Project Reports of Oils, Fats and Derivatives

Project Report of Synthetic Resins,Emulsifiers,Polymers

Project Report of Real Estate, Hotel, Hospital, Hosiery

Project Report of Soap, Detergents & Household Soaps

Project Report of Rubber Chemicals, Compound

Profitable Project Reports

Aluminium Based Project Reports

Project Report of Copper Products

Disposable and Surgical Project Reports

Project Report of Dye Intermediates

Project Report of Chemicals and Allied Industries

Project Report of Dairy Farming, Milk Processing

Project Report of Computer Products

Tricalcium Phosphate

Automobiles and Mechanical Project Reports

Project Report of Abrasive, Asbestos

Project Report of Alcohol, Beer & Wine

Project Feasibility Report on Instant Ice Cream Mix

Project Reports

Project Report of Kraft Paper

Project Report of Vermi Composting

Project Report of Technology of Building Materials

Project Report of Mineral

Baby Care Products Project Report

Project Report Dairy Milk Processing with Power Plant

Fruit Processing Industry

Detailed Project Reports, Feasibility Studies, Industrial Market Techno Economic Reports

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To meet the specific requirements of our clients, we provide Project Reports, Market Survey Reports, Project Feasibility, Detailed Project Reports, Pre-Investment and Pre-Feasibility, Identification of new Projects, Preparation of Project Profiles, Industrial Project Feasibility Studies on several topics like farming, edible oil, tobacco and various types of reports. All our reports are prepared by the area or field experts, who have years of experience and in-depth knowledge in their respective domains. In addition to this, we include complete analysis and advantages & disadvantages of particular thing of research.

Each Detailed Project Report Contains

  • Introduction: Project Mix, Uses & Applications, Quality Control Measure & Their Introduction for Attaining Required Properties Economy & Productivity Competence
  • Market survey: Market Position, Installed Capacity Production, Anticipated Demand, Present Manufacturing the Product, Imports & Exports, Estimated Demand, Demand & Supply Gap(If available), LI/IL Issued Recently
  • Raw material: Raw Material Specifications, Market Codes & Raw Material Prices, Sources Of Procurement Of Raw Materials[ Imported /Indigenous]
  • Process of manufacture: Manufacturing Process, Formulations, Process Flow Sheet Diagram
  • Plant & machinery: Range Of Machineries Required, Detailed Specifications of Machines & Equipments, Prices Of Machineries, Suppliers of Plant & Machineries
  • Land & building: Total Land Area Requirement With Rates, Covered Area Break-Up With Estimated Costs Of Construction
  • Project economics: Land & Buildings, Plant, Machinery & Other Fixed Assets, Total Capital Investment, Working Capital Assessment, Raw Material & Consumable Stores, Staff Salaries & Wages, Utilities & Over heads, Total Cost Of Project, Sources Of Finance/Refinance, Break Even Point Determination
  • Annexures of charts/financial aspects: Repayment Schedule For 5 Yrs., Result Of Performance, Depreciation Chart For 5 Years, Cash Flow Statement For 5 yrs., Projected Balance Sheet and Land Man Ratio


Project Report Roasted, Dried, Salted Sunflower Seed

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Project Report Roasted, Dried, Salted Sunflower Seed

Roasted, Dried, Salted, Cashewnuts, Almonds, Pista, Peanuts, Dried Coconut sunflower seed

Price

17894/-

Author

EIRI Project Consultants

 

 

 


Other Information
  • Pay Mode Terms: L/C (Letter of Credit), T/T (Bank Transfer)


Project Report of Packaged Drinking Water Based Industries

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Project Report of Packaged Drinking Water Based Industries

Water is a chemical substance with the chemical formula H2O. A water molecule contains one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms connected by covalent bonds. Water is a liquid at ambient conditions, but it often co-exists on Earth with its solid state, ice, and gaseous state (water vapor or steam). Water also exists in a liquid crystal state near hydrophilic surfaces. Under nomenclature used to name chemical compounds, Dihydrogen monoxide is the scientific name for water, though it is almost never used. As the name implies, the mineral water is the purified water fortified with requisite amounts of minerals such as Barium, Iron, Manganese, etc. which can be absorbed by human body. It is either obtained from natural resources like spring and drilled wells or it is fortified artificially by blending and treating with mineral salts. The mineral water shall be manufactured and packed under hygienic conditions in properly washed and cleaned bottles in sterilised conditions.

Unfortunately sufficient safe potable water is not available everywhere in the country, either harmful chemical substances are found in the layers of earth which enter into water or it may be contaminated due to pathogenic micro-organisms. If such water is consumed, the body suffers from water born diseases. Due to this, it has become imperative to process and bottle safe potable water for the mankind in prevailing conditions. The demand for purified water becomes more during summer season. Although few companies have already entered in the bottling of safe potable water and mineralised water, but still huge gap is there in between demand and supply at all metropolitan-cities and towns. The product is widely accepted in offices, restaurants, railway stations, airport, bus stands, hospitals and to some extent even in rich house-holds. So there is good scope for establishing the units for processing and bottling plain and mineralised drinking water in different parts of the country. Water for All, Water, Groundwater Mining, Groundwater Development in India, Freshwater Resources and Their Conjunctive Use, Technologies for Recycling of Waste Water, Recovery of Water from Domestic and Industrial Waste Water, Reverse Osmosis, Water/Effluent Treatment Plant in the Food Processing Industries, Recovery of Water From Non-Conventional Resources, Cooling Water System Management, Waste Water Use, Techniques for Water Conservation in Food and Beverage (F & B) Industry, Plastics Containers for Drinking Potable Water and Regulations.

The Great Threat of Poor Quality of Counterfeiting Bottling Water, Water Treatment Using Ozone, Water Conservation by Optimizing Water Use, Non-Conventional Techniques to Remove Heavy Metals from Wastewater, Cooling Water Treatment, Role of Membrane Filtration for Industrial Water Treatment and Wastewater Reuse, Meeting Water Quality needs Through Multiple Technologies, Use of Ozone in Packaged Drinking Water Disinfection and Purification. How Safe is Bottled Water, Ozone – A Boon to Bottlers, Advances in Membrane Technology for Beverage Water Treatment, Application of Membrane Technology in Water Processing, Ozone - the 21st Century Disinfectant, Manufacturing Mineral Water i.e. Water Containing Sufficient/Required Quantity of Minerals which is Required to Human Bodies, Project Profile on Purified Bottled Water, Technology and Market Trend of Packaged Drinking Water, Mineral Water Plant/ Packaged Drinking Water Plant With ISI Lab and Certification, Mineral Water Plant, Project Profile on Mineral Water, The Use of Distillation Technology in the Bottled Water Industry.



Project Report of Steel, Stainless Steel, Non Ferrous Metals

Project Report of Steel, Stainless Steel, Non Ferrous Metals

Steel, Stainless Steel, Non Ferrous Metals, Rolling Mill, Billets, Galvanizing, Forging, Casting, Wi
In metalworking, rolling is a metal forming process in which metal stock is passed through a pair of rolls. Rolling is classified according to the temperature of the metal rolled. If the temperature of the metal is above its recrystallization temperature, then the process is termed as hot rolling. If the temperature of the metal is below its recrystallization temperature, the process is termed as cold rolling. In terms of usage, hot rolling processes more tonnage than any other manufacturing process and cold rolling processes the most tonnage out of all cold working processes. There are many types of rolling processes, including flat rolling, foil rolling, ring rolling, roll bending, roll forming, profile rolling, and controlled rolling.

Originally, a “billet” (from the French) was a note, commonly used in the 18th and early 19th centuries as a “billet of invitation.” A particular use of the word in this sense is to denote an order issued to a soldier entitling him to quarters with a certain person. From this meaning, the word billet came to be loosely used of the quarters thus obtained. Repeated petitions against the practice of billeting, starting in the 16th century, culminated in its outlawing in 1689 as an extension of a section of the Petition of Right 1628. During wartime, civilians who have been evacuated from a city in danger of attack are billeted in communal shelters or in the homes of individuals. The practice of billeting evacuees was widespread in Britain during World War II, particularly during the Blitz, when children and other non-essential persons in major cities were sent to rural areas for safety.

In European countries since the formation of regular forces the Quartermaster was an occupation and a rank of the individuals responsible for provision of sleeping quarters as well as other provisions for regular time troops. In general, galvanized sheet metal is mild (carbon) steel that is used for a ton of different things. This material is tough and strong, and it can be fairly easily worked (bent or formed) in a number of different ways to produce useful products (like HVAC ductwork, to name just one application). It lasts a long time, too, because the zinc coating (the galvanizing) inhibits corrosion quite well.

Forging or cold forming are metal forming processes. There is no melting and consequent solidification involved. Plastic deformation produces an increase in the number of dislocations resulting in a higher state of internal stress. Indeed, strain hardening is attributed to the interaction of dislocations with other dislocations and other barriers (such as grain boundaries). Simultaneously, the shape of primary crystals (dendrites) changes after plastic working of the metal. Dendrites are stretched in the direction of metal flow and thus form fibers of increased strength along the direction of flow. Casting is a solidification process. Therefore, the microstructure can be finely tuned, such as grain structure, phase transformations and precipitation. However, defects such as shrinkage porosity, cracks and segregation are also intimately linked to solidification. These defects can lead to lower mechanical properties.


Project Report of Gum, Adhesives & Sealants Technology Books

Project Report of Gum, Adhesives & Sealants Technology Books

EIRI have published the following Technology Books on Gums, Adhesives and Sealants Industries. An adhesive is a compound that adheres or bonds two items together so as to form a single unit. Adhesives may come from either natural or synthetic sources. Adhesives and sealants virtually touch every part of our lives. Some modern adhesives are extremely strong, and are becoming increasingly important in modern construction
and industry.


Types of adhesives:

 

Adhesives are classified based on:

 

  • Origin: Natural, Synthetic
  • Properties: Hot melts, Pressure sensitive, Reactive, UV curing
  • Resins used: Epoxies, Cyanoacrylates
  • Sealants: A sealant is a material used to prevent some form of fluid from escaping its container or providing a leak proof barrier. Ex. Fixing of glass window frames in aluminum channel. Seven major end uses define adhesives sealants industry : construction, packaging,transportation, rigid and non-rigid bonding, consumer products and tapes. The top three sectors represented by construction, packaging and transportation drive the market

 

Proposal:


Considering the growth in construction, furniture, rigid and flexible bonding segments, Apitco recommends that an Adhesive formulation unit can be considered by a new entrant.




Project Report of Cosmetic Technology

Project Report of Cosmetic Technology

The Indian cosmetic Industry has witnessed rapid growth in the last couple of years, growing at a CAGR of around 7.5% between 2006 and 2008. With improving purchasing power and increasing fashion consciousness, the industry is expected to maintain the growth momentum (with marginal slowdown due to economic slowdown) during our forecast period (2009-2012). It is projected to grow at a CAGR of around 7% during the forecast period, says "Indian Cosmetic Sector Analysis (2009-2012)", a recent research report by RNCOS. Both electronic as well as print media are playing an important role in spreading awareness about cosmetic products and developing fashion consciousness among the Indian consumers. With the introduction of satellite television and a number of television channels as well as the Internet, the Indian consumers are constantly being updated about new cosmetic products, translating into the desire to purchase them. Additionally, the flourishing Indian fashion/film industry is fueling growth in the industry by making Indians to realize the importance of having good looks and appearances.

Despite the massive surge in the popularity of cosmetic products, our report finds that the average consumer spending on cosmetic products in India is much lesser than any other part of the world. This implies that the Indian cosmetic industry has an even greater potential for growth in future than present. At present, most of cosmetics manufacturers in India cater to the domestic market but they are gradually establishing their footholds in overseas markets. In recent years, the Indian cosmetic manufactures have received orders from overseas markets; for example - Indian herbal cosmetic products have a tremendous demand in the international market. However, manufactures should not forget that the Indian domestic market is price sensitive and they need to work out innovative strategies to establish a foothold here, the report added. Our report also provides an in-depth analysis of present and future prospects of the Indian cosmetics industry. It thoroughly evaluates the industry, with focus on current and future market position of important segments and respective key players. The report helps the clients to examine the factors critical for the success of the industry and enables them to understand the existing and future opportunities and challenges lying in the industry.

The report also provides forecast (2009-2012) on:

  • Skin Care
  • Hair Care
  • Color Cosmetics
  • Fragrances
  • Oral care
  • Toothpaste
  • Tooth Brush
  • Tooth Powder

The forecast given in this report is not based on a complex economic model, but is intended as a rough guide to the direction in which the market is likely to move. This forecast is based on correlations between past market growth, growth of base drivers and possible impact of recession on the economy.
Key Players Discussed in the Report. This section provides business overview of key players including Hindustan Unilever Limited, L'Oreal S.A, Marico Limited, Colgate Palmolive India Limited and Dabur India Limited.


Project Report of Building Materials & Chemicals

Project Report of Building Materials & Chemicals

Details:

Sl.No. Book Name Amount (INR)
1 Book on Technology of Building Materials and Chemicals ISBN-81-86732-54-3 950/-




Project Report of Export Oriented Industries

Project Report of Export Oriented Industries

Details:

Sl.No. Book Name Amount (INR)
1 Hand Book of Export Oriented Industries ISBN-81-86732-08-X 1300/-
2 Start your own Export Business (How to Export) ISBN-81-86732-57-8 350/-




Project Report of Printing, Screen Printing & Packaging

Project Report of Printing, Screen Printing & Packaging

Details:

Sl.No. Book Name Amount (INR)
1 Handbook of Printing Processes Technologies & Industries 375/-
2 Hand Book of Packaging Industries 1300/-
3 Book on Plastic Processing & Packaging Industries ISBN –81-86732-11-X 450/-
4 Modern Packaging Technology for Processed Food, Bakery, Snack Food, Spice &
Allied Food ISBN –81-86732-28-4
600/-
5 Pharmaceuticals and Drugs Technology with Formulations ISBN –81-86732-52-7 950/-
6 Hand Book of Screen Printing with Process & Tech. ISBN –81-86732-63-2 350/-
7 Hand Book of Packaging Technology ISBN –81-86732-67-5 900/-
8 Hand Book of Printing Technology ISBN –81-86732-75-6 975/-
9 Hand Book of offset Printing Technology ISBN –81-86732-82-9 500/-
10 Hand Book of Food Packaging Technology ISBN –81-86732-90-X 900/-



Project Report of Plastic Processing, Compounding

Project Report of Plastic Processing, Compounding

Project Report of Plastic Processing, Compounding, Moulds and Fibre Glass
Details:

Sl.No. Book Name Amount (INR)
1 Moulds Design & Processing Hand Book ISBN –81-86732-23-3 495/-
2 Book on Plastic Processing & Packaging Industries ISBN –81-86732-11-X 450/-
3 Plastic Projects (HI-Tech Plastic Projects) 1300/-
4 Book on Synthetic Resins Technology with Formulations ISBN –81-86732-40-3 800/-
5 Book on Rubber Chemicals & Processing Industries ISBN –81-86732-15-2 400/-
6 Pet Preform & Its Products (Bottles/Jar) Mfg ISBN –81-86732-24-1 1300/-
7 Plastic Compounding, Master batches, Pet and Other Plastic Processing Industries
ISBN –81086732-49-7
750/-
8 Book on Technology of Rubber and Rubber Goods Industries ISBN –81-86732-59-4 900/-
9 Technology of PVC Compounding & Its Applications ISBN –81-86732-88-8 900/-
10 Hand Book of Polymer & Plastic Technology ISBN –81-86732-92-6 950/-
11 Modern Rubber Chemicals Compounds and Rubber Goods
Technology ISBN –978-81-89765-19-4
1500/-
12 Book on Injection Moulding of Plastics ISBN –978-81-89765-20-0 750/-
13 Hand Book of Fiber Glass Moulding ISBN - 81-86732-94-2 450/-
14 Rotational Moulding Technology Hand Book ISBN- 978-81-89765-25-5 750/-
15 Hand Book of Plastic Materials and Processing Technology ISBN- 978-81-89765-26-2 750/-
16 Technology of Plastic Films ISBN – 81-89765-28-6 650/-
17 Plastic Waste Recycling Technology ISBN- 978-81-89765-30-9 750/-



Project Report of Paint, Varnish, Coating and Solvent

Project Report of Paint, Varnish, Coating and Solvent

Details:

Sl.No. Book Name Amount (INR)
1 Book on Paint Pigment Varnish & Lacquer Manufacturing ISBN –81-86732-16-0 450/-
2 Book on Paint Varnish Solvents & Coating Technology ISBN –81-86732-44-6 750/-
3 Technology of Synthetic Dyes, Pigments and Intermediates ISBN –81-86732-51-9 1100/-
4 Technology of Coatings, Resins, Pigments & Inks Industries ISBN –81-86732-64-0 975/-
5 Paint, Pigment, Solvent, Coating, Emulsion, Paint Additive ISBN –978-81-89765-15-6 900/-
6 Hand Book of Pre press ISBN –978-81-89765-27-9 800/-
7 Manufacturing Technology & Formulations Hand Book on Thinners, Putty, Wall &
Industrial Finishes and Synthetic Resins ISBN-978-81-89765-32-3
900/-



Project Report of Soap, Detergents, Cosmetics

Project Report of Soap, Detergents, Cosmetics

Soap, Detergents, Cosmetics/Herbal Cosmetics, Essential Oils/ And Fats, Refining Of Oils &
Perfume/Flavor.

Details:
Sl.No. Book Name Amount (INR)
1 Hand Book of Essential Oils Mfg. & Aromatic Plants ISBN-81-86732-27-6 650/-
2 Essential Oils Processes and Formulations Hand Book ISBN-81-86732-39-X 650/-
3 Hand Book of Perfumes & Flavors ISBN-81-86732-30-6 600/-
4 Manufacture of House Hold Soaps, Toilet Soaps and Other Soaps with Formulations
ISBN-81-86732-53-5
750/-
5 Profitable Small Scale Manufacture of Soaps & Detergents ISBN- 81-86732-25-X 375/-
6 Hand Book of Synthetic and Herbal Cosmetics (How to Make Beauty Products)
ISBN-81-86732-21-7
575/-
7 Cosmetics Processes & Formulations Hand Book ISBN-81-86732-41-1 900/-
8 Hand Book of Synthetic Detergents with Formulations ISBN-81-86732-43-8 900/-
9 Hand Book of Perfumes with Formulations ISBN-81-86732-42-X 750/-
10 Herbal Cosmetics & Beauty Products with Formulations ISBN- 81-86732-45-4 750/-
11 Hand Book of Oils, Fats and Derivatives with Refining and Packaging Technology
ISBN-81-86732-56-X
950/-
12 Modern Technology of Essential Oils ISBN-81-86732-71-3 850/-
13 Profitable Small Scale Manufacture of Cosmetics ISBN-81086732-81-0 950/-
14 Hand Book of Flavors Technology ISBN-81-86732-98-5 750/-
15 Technology of Herbal Cosmetics and Toiletries Products with Formulae
ISBN-978-81-89765-13-2
1100/-
16 Hand Book of Flavors & Food Colorants Technology ISBN-978-81-89765-11-8 1400/-
17 Technology of Perfumes Flavors & Essential Oils ISBN-978-81-89765-22-4 1175/-



Project Report of Paint, Varnish, Solvent, Thinner

Project Report of Paint, Varnish, Solvent, Thinner

Project Report of Paint, Varnish, Solvent, Thinner, Coating and Lacquers
The leaders in the organized paint industry in India are Asian Paints with over 40% market share, Kansai Nerolac (20%), Berger Paints (19%) and AkzoNobel (12%). Asian Paints is a market leader in the decorative segment while Kansai Nerolac dominates the industrial and automotive segment.


 Following all 54 project reports are covered in CD

    1.    Automobile paints   
    2.    Aluminium paint
    3.    Acrylic copolymer emulsion
    4.    Acrylic emulsion paints
    5.    Bituminous based corrosion resistant
    6.    Cement paint
    7.    Clear transparent lacquer for coating on brass
           bangles to make it weather-resistant  
    8.    Copper phthalocyanine blue & green
    9.    Dry distemper and cement paint
    10.  Emulsion paints
    11.  Electrophoric lacquer
    12.  Enamel removers
    13.  Enamelling of copper wire
    14.  Epoxy resins
    15.  Glass putty
    16.  Glass coating solution
    17.  Hammertone paints 
    18.  Insulating varnish
    19.  Insulating varnish (poly vinyl butyral based, ffc grade)
    20.  Lime colour/cement colour
    21.   Lacquer emulsion
    22.   Naphtha based thinner                          
    23.   N.C.Putty                                      
    24.   N.C. Thinners used in automobiles
    25.   Oil-bound distemper paints                     
    26.   Paint industry
    27.   Paint removers                                 
    28.   Paint driers
    29.   Powder coating paints   
   
   
Each Project Report covers Introduction, Uses & Application, Manufacturing Process, Market Survey, Project Estimates with Profitability Analysis, Break Even Point, Process Flow Sheet Diagram, Resources of Finance, List of Plant, Machinery and Raw Materials Suppliers, Cost of the Plant & Machinery and Raw Materials along with Suppliers etc.

Price Rs. 20,350/- or US $ 650/- for entire cd contins all 54 project reports




Project Report of Bakery and Confectionery Products

Project Report of Bakery and Confectionery Products

Bakery Industry in India

Bakery Industry has many regional players and only two (Parle and Britannia) are all India players. This situation has not changed for many years. Modern Food Industry which was a government of India enterprise had ventured into Modern Bread and had set up multiple production units with all India distribution net work. But post liberalization this got acquired by Hindustan Lever and those bread manufacturing units were closed down. ITC has been in this game for sometime now and their first launch of Sunfeast biscuits which is said to have acquired about 13 per cent market share in its own category. But we still cannot compare ITC with other two big players. ITC’s bakery business is still small and distributed all over India but the product range and the size of the business is still not that big although holds big promise. Priya Gold brand of biscuits in UP definitely created a regional success story and have given good competition to both Parle and Britannia. The large part of the biscuit volume comes from the cheaper low margin glucose category which absorbs bulk of the overheads. After many years, Britannia was able to create Tiger brand glucose biscuits.

Britannia is a leading player in the organized biscuit market with nearly 30 percent value share with annual sales over Rs. 16 billion. The Nusli Wadia group, one of the oldest business houses in India and Groupe Danone, a French multi products food company equally share 48.5 per cent promoter holding in Britannia. There was long tussle between these two groups over the registration of Tiger brand by Danone in some overseas countries. Of late, we hear that this issue has been sorted out. Danone, of late is trying to get out of bakery business altogether by selling their stake in Britannia to General Foods. While Britannia has the strong hold in north and east, Parle has the dominance in south and west. Britannia manufactures biscuits, cakes, breads as well as rusk while Parle is predominantly in biscuit business. Parle G is said to be the number one in terms of volume of biscuit sold in the world. Earlier we had Kwality Biscuits in south which was acquired by Britannia. In the east K.D Paul had set up a modern biscuit plant in Kolkata which is doing reasonably well and was able to establish a few brands which have local presence.

No biscuit company can thrive in business unless it has good volume in the low margin glucose and Marie category. The volume of specialty biscuits is low and that will not give any viability. Nestle and Dabur tried that in joint venture with Israeli company producing specialty biscuits and subsequently withdrawn. Smith Kline Beechem (manufacturer of Horlicks) has been selling Horlicks biscuits for many years. This is manufactured through the third party and volume is small and therefore, distribution is also limited. Cadbury also sells Cadbury chocolate biscuits and again volume is low. Sara Lee introduced biscuits brands and after couple of years withdrawn. Even Kellogg also ventured into specialty biscuits and withdrawn. Experience is so bad that any new players will think twice before getting into specialty biscuits again. There are many regional biscuit brands and businesses closed down. Notably amongst those are Dalmia in north belonging to the one of the Dalmia factions. Bakeman was another company which introduced many biscuit brands in India. They still exist but it is low key existence. Some of the manufacturing units are thriving only by producing for these two large players. The cake and cookies are for the small players sold through the local network of distribution. There is no big player in the cake category excepting Britannia.


Project Report of Chemicals, Dyes, Petrochemicals

Project Report of Chemicals, Dyes, Petrochemicals

India has achieved considerable progress in production of chemicals. And with slash in tariffs, Indian chemical companies with well-built systems and structured operations are likely to be benefited further.

It is not only country’s oldest industry, but the Indian Chemical Industry has been contributing to India’s growing economy in a phenomenal way. It may be hard to believe, but the industry serves the basic need of many different industry verticals like natural gas, water, oil, metals, minerals, air, oil, etc and all these verticals eventually bring into marketplace an array of products, almost 70000 products, to be precise. Today, India has achieved considerable progress in production of basic organic and inorganic chemicals, pesticides, paints, dyestuffs and intermediates, petrochemicals, fine and specialty chemicals and toiletry product segments. And with slash in tariffs, Indian chemical companies with well-built systems and structured operations are likely to be benefited further.

The companies manufacturing highly valued chemicals, and who are compliant of industrial quality standards, can make their mark not just in India but even in the overseas markets as well. In Indian context, the rise in disposable income has led to improved chemical consumption. This has aided country’s GDP climb further, from 9% to 13%. In an attempt to make the industry more progressive and flourishing, the government of India has introduced a slew of policies and special economic zones centering on the petrochemical sector. Furthermore, several manufacturing companies are focusing on expansion plans in the coming years. Chemicals and chemical products influence our lives in a significant way. Be it donning synthetic clothes, or consuming drugs, or when it comes to using thermoplastic furniture at homes and offices, chemicals have become a way of life in this fast-changing world.

In addition, the industry plays a pivotal role in agricultural and development sectors. Some of the other sectors, like engineering, automotive, consumer durables and food processing also depend on this sector in a big way. The industry is on a high growth trajectory. The industry, through a series of efforts is expected to achieve USD 100 billion in the upcoming years. The industry’s contribution to the Indian manufacturing sector is almost 17.6 percent. Since the ages, Indian chemicals have been traded and today imports stand at USD 7.92 billion and exports at 5.95 billion. And now with the onset of liberalization and globalization, the Industry is on a major expansion spree. The industry today is into manufacturing wide range of goods including fine and specialty chemicals, drugs and pharmaceuticals, dyes and pigments, agrochemicals and fertilizers, pesticides, plastics and petrochemicals etc. However, Indian chemical industry is yet to makes its presence felt in a big way in the international markets.

 

Fast-facts on Indian chemical industry:

 

  • Highly fragmented
  • Operates at the micro level
  • Increased per capita consumption level has put the industry on fast-track
  • Higher cost of capital, import duties and power, making it less competitive in the international markets
  • Very little spotlight on Resource & Development
  • Presence of many multinational companies
  • Big players in bulk chemicals. Presence of small and big players in fine and specialty chemicals



Project Report of Cold Storage Unit

Project Report of Cold Storage Unit

India can become the food supplier of the world.

The country has a huge opportunity to become a leading global food supplier if only it has the right marketing strategies and of course efficient supply & cold chains management. The food supply chain is complex with perishable goods and numerous small stake holders. In India, the infrastructure connecting these partners is very weak. Also, demand forecasting is totally absent and the farmers try to push what they produce into the market.The cold chains segment can be subdivided into a number of sectors – agriculture, horticulture, fisheries & aquaculture, dairy, processed food for ready-to-eat/cook format together with the packaging companies, retailers, wholesalers and caterers are in the last stage of the cold chains. Against a requirement of over 31 million tonnes of cold storage, India has over 5,101 cold storage units with a cumulative capacity of nearly 21.7 million tonnes, leading to a loss of about 40% of the agri-produce post-harvest. The Indian cold chains market is largely untapped and lined by several players in the unorganized sector which clues for immense investment and development opportunities. Further, the diversity in terms of India’s population with several religious groups with different food habits and culture can be used to the advantage to become the “Halal food hub,” the “Organic food hub,” the “Vegetarian food hub” the “Sea food hub” and so on.

Currently, the Indian cold chain market is worth $2.6 billion. This market is expected to grow to $12.4 billion by 2015. Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal have 65% of the total installed capacity of cold storage in the country. Cold chains are used primarily for fruits and vegetables, meat and marine products, floriculture, dairy products, ice creams and confectionery. In the Vision 2015 paper, food processing minister Subodh Kant Sahai said the focus needed to be on areas of reducing post-harvest losses, building supply chain, cold chain, and developing linkages of farming to the processing industry. Particularly, the need of the hour is to adopt a strategy whereby cold storage facilities are provided collectively to production centers as ‘Cold Storage Centers’ with potential strengths for storing primary and processed agricultural products for most of the year.“ This should be supplemented with a good system of refrigerated transportation connecting farm level storage facilities, processing units and various distribution outlets as the present system of transporting by insulated trucks is not effective for long distance movement. At the retail outlet end, there is a need to develop display cabinets for marketing of frozen food products. India should also augment cold chain facilities and container handling facilities at major ports as also at air cargo complexes for targeting global markets. All this will not only need large-scale investments but also the development of appropriate technology more suitable to our requirements,” the minister said.

100% depreciation for cold chains investment:

Even after announcing 100 per cent depreciation for cold chain investments in the Union Budget for 2009, the industry is yet to come forward and make investments in the sector which is considered vital for the growth of agriculture and food processing sector in the country. Currently, a large chunk of fresh produce go to waste due to inadequate storage and processing facilities.
According to industry analysts, with integrated cold chains and supply chain management the country can save Rs. 75,000 crore annually by cutting 30 per cent wastage of perishable horticulture produce, besides garnering additional export revenue of Rs. 25,000 crore.


Project Report of Dairy Farm, Milk Processing

Project Report of Dairy Farm, Milk Processing

Indian Dairy Product is becoming viable in world market once again. Global milk powder price has hit a 15-month high in November’ 2009 – making domestic products exportable. High global price has become a dampener for import of milk powder making domestic industry outlook that much positive.


Fonterra - largest milk processor in the world:

 

Maintains an Internet based sales platform called Global Daily Trade. As per Global Daily Trade - average price of Whole Milk Powder (WMP) is USD 3437 per MT ex New Zealand ports for current month. This is the highest since August’  2008 when WMP price stood at USD 3705 per MT. Ironically, WMP price was a paltry USD 1829 during March – June’ 2009. Increasing demand from global food processors is the main reason for such high price and is expected to remain firm as world economy recovers from recession through 2009-10. Another reason for such stiff jump in global prices is general decline in milk production in Western Europe, Australia and the USA where farmers reduced herd sizes because of falling milk prices. Above all, the European Commission has scaled down export subsidies . For example, the refund on skimmed milk powder (SMP) shipment has been slashed down to zero from Euro 228 per MT. Similarly, refund for WMP came down to Euro 175 from 350 and that of butter oil reduced to Euro 456 from Euro 787.


Indian Dairy Industry Outlook Positive:


Increasing global price and declining production makes Indian dairy industry outlook positive. On one hand, industry feels safe from large scale import, as has been happening throughout 2008. On the other hand, high global price has made Indian dairy products viable for export.

Import is Virtually Ruled Out:

During 2009 – Indian imported 20,000 MT of Butter Oil at an average price of USD 1700 to 1800 per MT. Today, the same Butter Oil from New Zealand is quoting at over USD 4700 per MT !   Add 30 per cent import duty and other expenses – the final price will be much higher than ex-factory ghee price, which is currently Rs. 240-270 a Kg.

Same story for milk powder:


During July’ 2009, SMP price from East Europe was USD 1800 – USD 1900 per MT. Today, it costs at least USD 1000 more per MT and is likely to scale even higher.

Export Is Viable Now:

Export of Indian dairy product has already started. During Aug – Oct’ 2009, over 3000 MT casein has been exported. Apart from Exporters, Indian farmers are getting good price for milk even during winter when traditionally milk prices fall.




Project Report of Essential Oils, Flavors

Project Report of Essential Oils, Flavors

Spices are used for flavor, color, aroma and preservation of food or beverages. Spices may be derived from many parts of the plant: bark, buds, flowers, fruits, leaves, rhizomes, roots, seeds, stigmas and styles or the entire plant tops. The term ‘herb’ is used as a subset of spice and refers to plants with aromatic leaves. Spices are often dried and used in a processed but complete state. Another option is to prepare extracts such as essential oils by distilling the raw spice material (wet or dry), or to use solvents to extract oleoresins and other standardized products. There are many texts which provide an overview of the industry in general or for specific crops. Essential oils are liquid products of steam or water distillation of plant parts (leaves, stems, bark, seeds, fruits, roots and plant exudates). Expression is used exclusively for the extraction of citrus oil from the fruit peel, because the chemical components of the oil are easily damaged by heat. Citrus oil production is now a major by-product process of the juice industry.

An essential oil may contain up to several hundred chemical compounds and this complex mixture of compounds gives the oil its characteristic fragrance and flavor. An essential oil may also be fractioned and sold as individual natural components. Other processing options can also produce further products that can be sold alongside essential oils. The plant parts can be extracted with organic solvents to produce oleoresins, concretes and absolutes or extracted with a near or supercritical solvent such as carbon dioxide to produce very high quality extracts. These oleoresins and extracts contain not only the volatile essential oil but also the concentrated non-volatile flavor components and these have wide application in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

The solvent extraction processes are more difficult and complex than steam distillation and will normally be beyond the financial resources of most small scale processors, but supplying the raw materials to these extraction plants can be a market option. The most important spices traditionally traded throughout the world are products of tropical environments. The major exceptions to this group are the capsicums (chilli peppers, paprika), and coriander which are grown over a much wider range of tropical and nontropical environments. Production of spices and essential oils in these wet and humid environments brings special difficulties for crop and product management. Drying the crop to ensure a stable stored product is of particular importance, and in wet humid environments this creates the need for efficient and effective drying systems.

 

Major spice crops in world trade:


In terms of world trade value, the most important spice crops from the tropical regions are pepper, capsicums, nutmeg/mace, cardamom, all spice/pimento, vanilla, cloves, ginger, cinnamon and cassia, and turmeric. Coriander, cumin, mustard, and sesame seeds and the herbs sage, oregano, thyme, bay and the mints are the most important spice crops from non-tropical environments.




Project Report of Building Materials & Chemicals

Project Report of Building Materials & Chemicals

With the advent of modern civilization and development of scientific knowledge, there has been an upsurge in demand for developing newer materials for novel applications. In fact, with the technological leaps in recent times, focus has been on developing the materials required to perform in stringent conditions - high temperature & pressure, highly corrosive environment, higher strength but without much weight implications etc. which the conventional materials failed to service. This ushered in 'engineered material', devising material properties catering to the application needs. And the innovation was not limited to developing materials with novel properties alone but it also addressed the method of manufacturing - improved processing techniques, effective use of energy while processing and more importantly with the least environmental impact. Advanced materials with combination of properties for specific end uses became a reality. Over the last thirty years composite materials, plastics, and ceramics have been the dominant emerging materials. The volume and number of applications of composite materials has grown steadily, penetrating and conquering new markets relentlessly. Modern composite materials constitute a significant proportion of the engineered materials market ranging from everyday products to sophisticated niche applications.

Today high performance fibre reinforced plastics (FRP) are starting to challenge those ubiquitous materials such as steel & aluminium in everyday applications as diverse as automobile bodies and civil infrastructure. It would be naive to suggest that FRP will dislodge those materials from their dominant roles. However, continuous advances in the manufacturing technologies and performance of FRP have intensified the competition in a growing range of applications leading to significant growth in its market acceptance. For any given application and industry sector, the final choice is often a competitive outcome of alternative solutions, including advances in alternative materials such as aluminium alloys and metal-composite hybrids. Each type of composite brings its own performance characteristics that are typically suited for specific applications. Increasingly enabled by the introduction of newer polymer resin matrix materials and high performance reinforcement fibres of glass, carbon and aramid, the penetration of these advanced material forms has witnessed a steady expansion in usage. The increased consumption has reduced the product cost. High performance FRP can now be found in such diverse applications as composite armouring designed to resist explosive impacts, fuel cylinders for natural gas vehicles, windmill blades, industrial drive shafts, support beams of highway bridges and even paper making rollers.

An examination of the diversity of some of these newer applications and the socio-commercial considerations that underpin their introduction gives an instructive insight into the future place of high performance FRP. The development of a composite component involves both material and structural design. Unlike conventional materials, the properties of the composite material can be varied considering the end application. Properties (stiffness, thermal expansion etc.) can be varied continuously over a broad range of values by suitable selection of resin, fibre, their ratio, additives etc.



Project Report of Fish Farming & Fishery Products

Project Report of Fish Farming & Fishery Products

Exports had risen to $1.8 billion (around Rs 7,110 crore) in fiscal 2006-07, some 12% of India’s Rs 60,000 crore seafood industry, which is now in troubled waters. Faced with the problem of catching fewer fish, several farmers are abandoning their unviable aquaculture farms and the processing units are either closing or  retrenching employees. Around 25,000 people in the marine processing sector have been rendered jobless in the last five months. Ecological issues such as polluting fish-breeding waters and shrinking mangroves are also adding to the woes of the industry. Seven of 15 seafood processing factories in Gujarat, on the west coast, were closed in the last one year, says Thajudeen S., managing director of Hiravati Marine Products Pvt. Ltd, which has been around for 35 years. Only one of his four units is functioning and, even in this unit, he was forced to retrench 800 workers in November. “We are not getting enough fish for processing and there is very little work for us,” he says.

Closing of processing factories and abandoning of farms are forcing skilled labourers to migrate to construction work that has picked up in Orissa, West Bengal, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu.According to Thajudeen, some of the problems are human-made. “Too much of fishing activities are going on and even juvenile fish is not spared,” he says. With a number of check dams being built across rivers, there is little fresh water flowing into the sea whose salinity is not diluted, making it unsuitable for fish to breed. The destruction of mangroves, home to a variety of fish such as ribbon fish, cuttle and squid, also added to the industry’s plight. “A number of mangroves are being destroyed to create space for industrial activities. The petrochemical factories dump their waste into the water and pollute it,” Thajudeen says.

According to G. Mohanty, president of the Orissa region of the Seafood Exporters Association of India, the situation in Orissa and Bengal is no different. He says the cost of producing black tiger shrimp in aquaculture farms is around Rs 170-180 a kg but they fetch hardly Rs 200 when exported. Taking into consideration the cost of processing, transportation and freight, on every kg of black tiger shrimp exported, an exporter loses around Rs 20. Many farmers are being forced to abandon their aquaculture farms as they are not making profits any more from the business they had started about 20 years ago. “Normally the aquaculture farms get ready by January but there is very little activity this year, indicating growing disinterest of farmers,” Mohanty says. This has also resulted in lower sale of fish feeds, says Ravi Reddy, managing director of Chennai-based Shanti Fisheries Ltd. “Normally, the fish feed sells around 12,000 tonnes every year. We will not be able to sell even 50% of that this season,” he says. The total feed consumption of the industry has been around 180,000 tonnes.



Project Reports of Oils, Fats and Derivatives

Project Reports of Oils, Fats and Derivatives

Importance of Edible Oils in the Country’s Economy:

Oil seeds and edible oils are two of the most sensitive essential commodities. India is one of the largest producers of oil seeds in the world and this sector occupies an important position in the agricultural economy and accounting for the estimated production of 28.21 million tonnes of nine cultivated oil seeds during the year 2007-08. India contributes about 6-7% of the world oil seeds production. Export of oil meals, oil seeds and minor oils has increased from 5.06 million Tones in the financial year 2005-06 to 7.3 million tons in the   financial year 2006-07.  In terms of value, realization has gone up from Rs. 5514 crores to Rs. 7997 crores. India accounted for about 6.4% of world oil meal export.

Types of Oils commonly in use in India
:

India is fortunate in having a wide range of oilseeds crops grown in its different agro climatic zones. Groundnut, mustard/rapeseed, sesame, safflower, linseed, nigerseed/castor are the major traditionally cultivated oilseeds. Soybean and sunflower have also assumed importance in recent years. Coconut is most important amongst the plantation crops. Efforts are being made to grow oil palm in Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu in addition to Kerala and Andaman & Nicobar Islands. Among the non-conventional oils, rice bran oil and cottonseed oil are the most important. In addition, oilseeds of tree and forest origin, which grow mostly in tribal inhabited areas, are also a significant source of oils.




Project Report of Synthetic Resins,Emulsifiers,Polymers

Project Report of Synthetic Resins,Emulsifiers,Polymers

Synthetic Resin - a resin having a polymeric structure; especially a resin in the raw state; used chiefly in plastics acrylate resin, acrylic resin, acrylic - a glassy thermoplastic; can be cast and molded or used in coatings and adhesives polyethylene, polythene - a lightweight thermoplastic; used especially in packaging and insulation allyl resin - a resin derived from allyl alcohol that hardens when cured; used as an adhesive resin, rosin - any of a class of solid or semisolid viscous substances obtained either as exudations from certain plants or prepared by polymerization of simple molecules urea - formaldehyde resin - a clear thermosetting resin made from urea and formaldehyde and used in electrical fittings, adhesives, and finishes alkyd, alkyd resin - a durable synthetic resin widely used in adhesives and paints
phenolic, phenolic resin, phenoplast - a thermosetting resin.

Epoxy, epoxy glue, epoxy resin - a thermosetting resin; used chiefly in strong adhesives and coatings and laminates melamine resin - a thermosetting resin formed from melamine and an aldehyde; used in molded products, adhesives, and coatings polyester - any of numerous synthetic resins; they are light and strong and weather resistant polymer - a naturally occurring or synthetic compound consisting of large molecules made up of a linked series of repeated simple monomers polyvinyl resin, vinyl polymer, vinyl resin - a thermoplastic derived by polymerization from compounds containing the vinyl group

Resin is a naturally occurring substance that is produced by certain trees. This viscous fluid has been replicated by scientists and is called synthetic resin. Synthetic resins have properties that are extremely similar to their naturally occurring counterparts, most important of which is the ability to harden with the application of heat or pressure, or a combination of both. Products that are created by using synthetic resin include automotive parts, food containers, and pipes. Synthetic resin is typically manufactured using a chemical polymerization process. This process then results in the creation of polymers that are more stable and homogeneous than naturally occurring resin. Since they are more stable and are cheaper, various forms of synthetic resin are used in a variety of products, such as plastics, paints, varnishes, and textiles.

Generally, synthetic resins are broadly categorized into two areas: thermoplastic synthetic resins and thermosetting synthetic resins. Thermoplastic resins are those that can be softened and reformed through application of heat and pressure, even after being set in a particular shape. The process can be repeated unless the polymeric bonds within the resin are broken. This type of synthetic resin includes polyethylene resin, polypropylene resin, and polyvinyl Chlorine (PVC). Some of the largest applications for this polymer resin class include packaging films, molded food containers, and molded cup holders. This type of resin is also used extensively for automotive parts that are formed using an injection-molding process. PVC resin is used commonly for pipes and conduits, as well.




Project Report of Real Estate, Hotel, Hospital, Hosiery

Project Report of Real Estate, Hotel, Hospital, Hosiery

Project Report of Real Estate, Hotel, Hospital, Hosiery, Textiles Projects



Project Report of Soap, Detergents & Household Soaps

Project Report of Soap, Detergents & Household Soaps

Washing Soap and Detergent:

Soap is the traditional washing compound made from oil fats and caustic alkali. One can say a detergent is the one that cleans any surface. Synthetic detergent is quite different from other kinds of detergent. More foam is produced with such kind of detergents, moreover, there is less tension created on the dirty surface yet emulsification takes places and the detergent nters the surface much faster. This is the reason why the cleaning process is fast. The market for washing soap is encouraging even in tribal areas. People can now willing to use washing soap as they are recognizing importance of cleaning.


Project Report of Rubber Chemicals, Compound

Project Report of Rubber Chemicals, Compound

Macromolecular material which has, or can be given, properties of:

Returning rapidly (at room temperature) to the approximate shape from which it has been substantially distorted by a weak stress, and Not being easily remolded to a permanent shape by the application of heat and moderate pressure.

Varieties of rubber:

  • Natural latex - This is a white fluid obtained from the rubber tree. It contains small particles of rubber dispersed in an aqueous medium. The aqueous medium also contains plant proteins which are thought to be responsible for triggering the allergy
  • Natural rubber - This includes all material made from or containing latex. Natural rubber is made by two processes, the natural rubber latex process (NRL) and the dry natural rubber process (DNR)

DNR process:

This involves compressing the rubber at a high temperature and pressure. The plant proteins, responsible for the allergy, are denatured at these temperatures and pressures and therefore pose a lower risk than rubber made by the NRL process.

NRL process:

This involves the use of natural latex in a concentrated colloidal suspension. This type of latex contains a much greater proportion of plant proteins than latex produced by the DNR process. Most immediate type reactions result from exposure to NRL products.

Standard Grades:

Natural rubber is produced primarily in three countries:

  • Thailand
  • Malaysia
  • Indonesia

The following are the specifications scheme for each country:

  • STR : Standard Thai Rubber
  • SMR: Standard Malaysia Rubber
  • SIR : Standard Indonesia Rubber

Present Status in India:

With around 6000 unit comprising 30 large scale, 300 medium scale and around 5600 SSI/tiny sector nits, manufacturing 35000 rubber products, employing 400 hundred thousand people, including around 22000 technically qualified support personnel, with a turnover of Rs. 200 billions and contributing Rs. 40 billions to the National Exchequer through taxes, duties and other levies, the Indian Rubber Industry plays a core sector role in the Indian national economy.

An extensive plantation sector:

  • Indigenous availability of the basic raw materials, like natural rubber, synthetic rubber, reclaim rubber, carbon black, rubber chemicals, fatty acids, rayon and nylon yarn and so on
  • A large domestic market
  • Availability of cheap labor
  • Training facility in various technical institutes
  • On-going economic reforms
  • Improved living standards of the masses

India and the world:

India is the third largest producer, fourth largest consumer of natural rubber and fifth largest consumer of natural rubber and synthetic rubber together in the world. Besides, India is the world's largest manufacturer of reclaim rubber. In fact, India and China are the only two countries in the world which have the capacity to consume the entire indigenous production of natural rubber and thereby obviate the compulsion and over dependence on exports of surplus quantity of natural rubber. The plantation sector with an estimated production of over 630 hundred thousand tones of natural rubber and a projected production of more than one million tones in near future, helps radical and rapid growth of the Indian rubber industry. The growth prospect is further enlarged by a boom in the vehicle industry, improved living standards of the masses and rapid over-all industrialization.



Profitable Project Reports

Profitable Project Reports

How to set-up an Export Oriented Unit

EOU Scheme
:

The needs for higher level of technological and industrial progress made the Government devise a series of export promotional schemes. EOU & SEZ Schemes are one among them, which provides an internationally competitive duty free environment coupled with better infrastructural facilities for export production.

Export Oriented Units (EOUs) now constitute a very important sector in the country’s Export Production scenario. They have become dominant players in our export strategy, and their share in the Country’s export performance is about 10%. The export growth rate of 30% compares very favorably with the National export growth rate.

"How to set-up an Export Oriented Unit (EOU)."



Aluminium Based Project Reports

Aluminium Based Project Reports

Aluminium Industry in India is a highly concentrated industry with the top 5 companies constituting the majority of the country's production. With the growing demand of aluminium in India, the Indian aluminium industry is also growing at an enviable pace. In fact, the production of aluminium in India is currently outspacing the demand.Though India's per capita consumption of aluminium stands too low (under 1 kg) comparing to the per capita consumptions of other countries like US & Europe (range from 25 to 30 kgs), Japan (15 kgs), Taiwan (10 kgs) and China (3 kgs), the demand is growing gradually. In India, the industries that require aluminium most include power (44%), consumer durables, transportation (10-12%), construction (17%) and packaging etc.

The Background:

Though the existence of Aluminium was first established in the year 1808, it took almost 46 years to make its production commercially viable. The research work of several years resulted in extracting the aluminium from the ore. Aluminium is third most available element in the earth constituting almost 7.3% by mass. Currently it is also the second most used metal in the world after steel. Due to the consistent growth of Indian economy at a rate of 8%, the demand for metals, used for various sectors, is also on the higher side. As a result, the Indian aluminium industry is also growing consistently. In FY09, the aluminium industry in India saw a growth of about 9%. The production of aluminium started in India in 1938 when the Aluminum Corporation of India's plant was commissioned. The plant which was set up with a financial and technical collaboration with Alcan, Canada had a capacity of producing 2,500 ton per annum. Hindustan Aluminum Corporation (Hindalco) was set up in UP in the year 1959; it had a capacity of producing 20,000 ton per annum. In 1965, a public sector enterprise Malco which had a capacity of 10,000 ton per annum was commissioned; by 1987, National Aluminium Company (NALCO) was commissioned to produce aluminium. It had a capacity of producing 0.218 million ton. During the 1970s, the government started regulating and controlling the Indian aluminium industry. Restrictions in entry and price distribution controls were quite common in the Indian aluminium sector. Aluminium Control Order was implemented where the aluminium producers had to sell 50% of their products for electrical usages. However, in 1989, the order was removed as the government decontrolling was revoked. With de-licensing of industry in 1991, the liberal import of technologies and capital goods was started. The liberalization resulted in a growth rate of 12% of the industry, comparing to the growth rate of 6% during the 1980.

Aluminium Production in India:

India is world's fifth largest aluminium producer with an aluminium production competence of around 2.7 million tones, accounting almost 5% of the total aluminium production in the world. India is also a huge reservoir of Bauxite with a Bauxite reserve of 3 billion tones.

The Production:

India lies at the eighth position in the list of leading primary aluminium producers in the world. India saw a significant growth in aluminium production in the past five years. In 2006-07, the production target of aluminium in India laid by the Ministry of Mines, Government of India was 1,153 KT, which was augmented to 1,237 KT in the next year (2007-08). Due to the growing demand from the construction, electrical, automobiles and packaging industry, the production of aluminium also hiked up. In FY 09, the total aluminium production in India was around 1.35 tonnes.



Project Report of Copper Products

Project Report of Copper Products

Copper consumption to rise 15% on demand from auto, Power sectors

Between 2000 and 2009, consumption of the red metal increased 9.7 per cent annually. India’s copper consumption is forecast to rise 15 per cent, the decade’s highest, on phenomenal growth in end-use sectors such as electricity, consumer electronics, industrial machinery, equipment and construction. the consumption growth is expected to de-accelerate in 2011 to eight per cent. according to the latest report by credit rating agency icra, copper use in the country is expected to grow to 650,000 tonnes by the end of the current calendar year as compared to 565,000 tonnes last year. total copper consumption is estimated to rise to 720,000 tonnes in 2011. between 2000 and 2009, consumption of the red metal increased 9.7 per cent annually. by comparison, consumption declined 0.1 per cent in 2008. the slow growth in consumption was primarily because of limited domestic capacity and supply, high import duties on concentrate and finished products, inadequate investments in telecom and power infrastructure, and high prices.

Consumption growth was high till 2007, but declined in 2008 and 2009 because of a price rally and the slowdown in industrial production and construction activity. even during the peak economic downturn of 2009, consumption rose 9.5 per cent to an estimated 564,000 tonnes, driven mainly by huge infrastructure spending and continuous growth in the manufacturing sector. the annual per capita consumption of copper in india is 0.47 kg, which compares poorly with china’s 5.4 kg and the world average of 2.7 kg. with stagnation in demand from the telecom sector, the electrical sector emerged as the largest consumer. the government initiatives (power board restructuring, the electricity act of 2003 and thrust on transmission and distribution) have created an environment where investments in the power sector will rise. power generation capacity addition is expected at around 78,700 mw during the 11th five-year plan (2008-12).
based on expected capacity expansions during the 11th plan and associated investments in transmission and distribution, the working group on power for the 11th plan has estimated copper requirement at 0.8 million tonnes between 2008 and 2012 and 0.81 million tonnes between 2013 and 2017. due to its high electrical conductivity, a prime application of copper is in wires and cables used to carry power and telecom signals.

The growth in copper consumption will be driven by high growth in the automotive sector. both automobile and auto component manufacturing sectors are growing rapidly with order books filled for the next two months. hence, transport equipment and industrial equipment manufacturing sectors, which consume nearly 35 per cent of the country’s total copper output, are likely to drive demand of the red metal this year, says navneet damani, base metal analyst with commodity broking firm anand rathi. Additionally, the government has laid huge emphasis on the construction sector, with a number of low-cost housing projects being planned for this year. the central government, in association with the state governments, has also drawn plans for mega power plants in various parts of the country. these two sectors, which consume nearly 36 per cent copper output of the country, have been on a massive expansion spree for the next five years. rapid growth in these sectors would drive copper consumption in the country, Damani said. following a 6.9 per cent decline in 2008, india’s refined copper production increased 7.8 per cent in 2009 to 721,000 tonnes. production increased at a five-year compounded rate of 11.5 per cent.



Disposable and Surgical Project Reports

Disposable and Surgical Project Reports

Offering surgical & disposable medical projects: Ayurvedic/herbal pharmacy, blood bags, bandage cloth weaving on power loom, crepe bandage, disposable surgical caps & masks, dextrose saline (i.v.fluid) in plastic bottle 5932.doc, dextrose saline (i.v. fluid), disposable needles for syringes, disposable plastic syringes, diagnostic center, electronics blood pressure measuring instrument, hospital cum nursing home, homeopathic medicines, i.v. fluids (ffs technology), i.v. set-cannula, intravenous, medical college, plastic i.v. bottles, plaster of Paris bandages, pharmaceuticals (tablet, capsules etc.), repacking of medicines, surgical cotton & bandage, surgical examination gloves, surgical bandage, surgical adhesive tape on cloth surface, surgical methylated spirit, sodium phosphate enema, veterinary medicines.

This cd contains profitable 28 surgical project reports each project report covers introduction, uses & application, manufacturing process, market survey, project estimates with profitability analysis, break even point, process flow sheet diagram, resources of finance, list of plant, machinery and raw materials suppliers, cost of the plant & machinery and raw materials along with suppliers etc.



Project Report of Dye Intermediates

Project Report of Dye Intermediates

The global market for chemical industry is currently a US$ 2 trillion out of which, the global Specialty chemicals industry accounted for sales of US$ 510 billion in 2008. Forty business segments in North America, Western Europe and Japan, with a combined market size of about US$ 382.5 billion, represented about 75% of total world Specialty chemicals sales in 2008. In that year, the world's five largest industries - active pharmaceutical ingredients & intermediates, pesticides, specialty polymers, electronic chemicals, oil field chemicals and construction chemicals had a market share of about 43%. The ten largest segments accounted for 62% of total annual Specialty chemicals sales.

The applications of Specialty chemicals vary enormously. These are used as cosmetic additives, water treatment products, dyes, sanitation agents, plasticizers, paints, adhesives, flavors and fragrances, paper, additives and industrial cleaners. Specialty chemicals find use in large variety of industries such as paints, adhesives, flavors and fragrances, paper, additives and industrial cleaners. The active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIS) is the largest segment of Specialty chemicals. Agrochemicals are mainly used for plant protection and improving crop yields. The Indian Agrochemicals industry has grown from mere Rs. 400 crores (US$ 0.9 billion) in the 70's to about Rs. 7000 crore (US$ 1.36 billion). Indian Agrochemicals Industry is the 3rd largest manufacturer of agrochemicals in Asia and 4th largest in the world after USA, Japan and China. The industry derives about 50% of its revenue from exports. The average yield per hectare in India is much lower to the developed countries for almost all the crops. Around Rs. 1,00,000 crore of agricultural output is lost due to pests. The Agrochemicals industry can be broadly classified into Insecticides, Fungicides, Weedicides/Herbicides and Rodenticides.

The Indian Dyestuffs industry consists of 900 units in the SSI sector and approximately 50 units in the organized sector. The installed capacity is estimated to be close to 1,50,000 metric tonnes per annum with an annual turnover of more than US$ 3.0 billion. India is expected to be a major player in dyestuffs industry, can aim for reaching 10 to 12 percent share of the world market over the next ten years. The industry is mainly concentrated in the two states of Gujarat and Maharashtra. It has forward and backward linkages with a variety of sectors like textiles, leather, paper, polymers, printing ink, medical use, electronics and foodstuffs. Today, the sector is a major employment provider and foreign exchange earner. India now supplies colorants that includes all types of dyestuffs, optical brighteners and dye Intermediates, particularly for reactive, acid, vat and direct dyes.


Project Report of Chemicals and Allied Industries

Project Report of Chemicals and Allied Industries

Chemical industry is one of India’s oldest industries, contributing significantly towards the industrial and economic growth of the nation. The Indian Chemical Industry forms the backbone of the industrial and agricultural development of India and provides building blocks for several downstream industries. According to the Department of Chemicals and Petrochemicals, the Indian chemical industry is estimated to be worth approximately US$ 35 bn, which is about 3% of India’s total GDP. The total investment in the Indian chemical industry is approximately US$ 60 bn and total employment generated was about 1 mn. In terms of volume, it is 12th largest in the world and 3rd largest in Asia. Exports of chemicals from India have increased significantly and account for about 14% of total exports and 9% of total imports of the country. The Indian chemical industry comprises both small and large-scale units. Fiscal concessions granted to the small sector in the mid-eighties led to the establishment of a large number of units in the Small Scale Industries (SSI) sector. The major sub segments of this industry include alkali, organic chemicals, inorganic chemicals, pesticides, dyes & dyestuffs and specialty chemicals. The Indian chemical industry deals in products like fertilizers, bromine compounds, catalyst, sodium and sodium compounds, dye intermediates, inks and resins, phosphorous, paint chemicals, coatings, isobutyl, zinc sulphate, zinc chloride, water treatment chemicals, organic surfactants, pigment dispersions, industrial aerosols and many more. The commodity chemicals are the largest segment in the chemical market.

Some of the major markets for chemicals are North America, Western Europe, Japan and emerging economies in Asia and Latin America. The Indian chemical industry is matured and is in the midst of a major restructuring and consolidation phase. Globalization has opened the doors for this sector to capture a major part of the global market pie. The sector has experienced many reforms in India and is expected to grow at 15% p.a. in the near future. The investment in R&D will also play a vital role in this sector. In a nutshell, the Indian chemical industry has a large potential to grow in domestic as well as in export markets. In the current market conditions, with an appreciating rupee, pricing will be a crucial factor while competing with other exporting countries. The ownership pattern of the chemical companies was inclined largely towards the private limited category that account for 69% of the total sample. It is followed by 11% of partnership firms indicating the huge gap between the largest and the second largest category in the sample. However, public limited entities account for 10% while 8% are proprietary concerns.

Details:

  • 53% of the private limited companies deal in organic chemicals, 9% deal in specialty chemicals while 15% are involved in inorganic chemicals
  • 58% of the public limited companies deal in organic chemicals
  • 77% companies from the sample are established before 1990 while 21% are established after 1990



Project Report of Chemicals and Allied Industries

Project Report of Chemicals and Allied Industries

Chemical Industry
       
Going forward, industry analysts expect a bottoming out of global operating rates in 2010 due to better demand prospects and further delays in capacity build-out. This could lead to a better-than-anticipated demand-supply balance. Volumes and revenues are expected to remain robust with strong Asian demand. The major concern however for the Indian petrochemical industry is the increased capacities from mostly Middle East due to a cheaper feedstock advantage. This could decrease the operating rates impacting the profitability of the petrochemical industry. This could lead to further consolidation.

The Global Chemical industry is valued at about US$ 1.7 trillion. After the nosedive in 2008-09, the global chemical industry has witnessed sings of recovery in 2009-10. According to Moody’s investors Service, the sector outlook for the chemical industry in both North America and Europe had changed from negative to stable. The stable industry sector outlook reflects a broad improvement in industrial demand across these regions since early 2009, and chemical buyers are appearing to be more open to price increases now than they were a year ago.


Project Report of Dairy Farming, Milk Processing

Project Report of Dairy Farming, Milk Processing

Project Report of Dairy Farming, Milk Processing and Dairy Products
The National Dairy Development Board (NDDB) has drawn up a blueprint for strengthening the cooperative dairy sector. Perspective 2010, as the plan is called, envisaged that milk procurement by cooperatives will increase from the current level of 5.75 million tonnes to 17.8 million tonnes by 2010. The number of dairy cooperative societies will increase from 84,289 to 1,29,480 while membership will increase from 10.62 million to 15.62 million. Milk marketing is expected to rise from the current 4.7 million tonnes to 14 million tonnes. According to the NDDB Annual Report for 1999-2000 released recently, Perspective 2010 was prepared after NDDB carried out extensive planning exercises with milk cooperative unions and federations across the country. It emphasizes four thrust areas: Strengthening the Cooperative Framework, Productivity Enhancement, Quality and Plant Management and National Information Network. Thirty-four projects valued at around Rs. 2,900 million are currently under execution. In the pipeline are a further 150 projects ranging from expansion of existing processing facilities to setting up of major new dairy plants.

The NDDB Board has already approved the revised lending terms of Perspective 2010. While loans at a very reasonable interest rate are available for building processing capacities, activities related to human resource development, productivity enhancement, quality control and building a national information network will be funded as interest free loans and/or with matching grants. Currently, research in animal breeding, genetics, nutrition and health are being carried out by the Productivity Enhancement Group. It continued to support the efforts of the cooperatives in enhancing milk production. The Quality Assurance Group worked with cooperatives and unions to identify and address key stages in the quality process, confirming that significant gains can be achieved. Accordingly, 90 per cent of the milk reaching consumers from the cooperatives will be from ISO Certified dairy plants by the year 2010.The National Information Network Group has initiated development of software and hardware that will link village cooperatives, unions and federations with the NDDB. It has also conducted a number of baseline studies in key milk sheds. All cooperative unions will be linked to and through an internet Dairy Information System. About 75 per cent of the unions will use computerized data processing in all major functional areas.

The Perspective 2010 targets call for increased geographical spread, organization of new cooperatives and strengthening of old ones, expanded services and enhanced market. The 45 cooperative feed plants affiliated to various unions also produced 1.4 million tonnes of cattle feed in 1999-2000, thereby meeting about 50 per cent of the country's supply. It is targeted to increase the daily cattle feed production from 4,066 tonnes to 8,628 tonnes by 2010.Even though the goals are challenging, NDDB's partnership with federations and unions is well placed to spearhead, a thrust of this magnitude. However, achievement of these objectives will depend in part on an environment where cooperatives can function in a competitive, liberalized economy with the same autonomy and accountability as other forms of enterprise. Also important to success will be favorable trade policies, climatic conditions and the availability of human and material resources. Thirty six years after NDDB's founding, a nationwide network of dairy cooperatives serves more than 10 million farmers in over 80,000 villages. More than Rs. 50,000 million flows back to the milk producers through their cooperatives each year.



Project Report of Computer Products

Project Report of Computer Products

Overview of Electronics Engineering

The Electronics Industry in India took off around 1965 with an orientation towards space and defense technologies. This was rigidly controlled and initiated by the government. This was followed by developments in consumer electronics mainly with transistor radios, Black & White TV, Calculators and other audio products. Color Televisions soon followed. In 1982-a significant year in the history of television in India - the government allowed thousands of color TV sets to be imported into the country to coincide with the broadcast of Asian Games in New Delhi. 1985 saw the advent of Computers and Telephone exchanges, which were succeeded by Digital Exchanges in 1988. The period between 1984 and 1990 was the golden period for electronics during which the industry witnessed continuous and rapid growth. From 1991 onwards, there was first an economic crises triggered by the Gulf War which was followed by political and economic uncertainties within the country. Pressure on the electronics industry remained though growth and developments have continued with digitalization in all sectors, and more recently the trend towards convergence of technologies.

After the software boom in mid 1990s India's focus shifted to software. While the hardware sector was treated with indifference by successive governments. Moreover the steep fall in custom tariffs made the hardware sector suddenly vulnerable to international competition. In 1997 the ITA agreement was signed at the WTO where India committed itself to total elimination of all customs duties on IT hardware by 2005. In the subsequent years, a number of companies turned sick and had to be closed down. At the same time companies like Moser Baer, Samtel Color, Celetronix etc. have made a mark globally.



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Tricalcium Phosphate

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Automobiles and Mechanical Project Reports

Automobiles and Mechanical Project Reports

Indian automotive component industry is reckoned to be dynamic, lucrative and committed to deliver global standards of quality at internationally competitive prices. India happened to be a happening destination for outsourcing of auto components. the automobile component industry is striving aggressively to make quality products complying with iso quality standard as a result, around 564 companies associated with acma "automotive component manufacturers association" have been awarded with iso quality certification. a company won japan quality medal and other 15 companies won the jipm excellence award.

Indian auto components industry tends to found a granite foundation in operational & manufacturing performance in order to obtain ambitious & promising target and hit the international benchmarks on quality, cost, supply, customer satisfaction & value. there is a constant strive for enhancing technology, honing research & development skill, improving productivity, and erecting the large pool of specialties & expertise. government, other organization like unido & acma, and overseas technology partners are cooperating and closely supervising the industry to actualize this aspiring dream.



Project Report of Abrasive, Asbestos

Project Report of Abrasive, Asbestos

Project Report of Abrasive, Asbestos, Cement Refractories, Tiles and Bricks

Cement Industry in India

Cement Industry in India is on a roll at the moment. Driven by a booming real estate sector, global demand and increased activity in infrastructure development such as state and national highways, the cement industry has witnessed tremendous growth. Production capacity has gone up and top cement companies of the world are vying to enter the Indian market, thereby sparking off a spate of mergers and acquisitions. Indian cement industry is currently ranked second in the world.

The origins of Indian cement industry can be traced back to 1914 when the first unit was set-up at Porbandar with a capacity of 1000 tonnes. Today cement industry comprises of 125 large cement plants and more than 300 mini cement plants. The Cement Corporation of India, which is a Central Public Sector Undertaking, has 10 units. There are 10 large cement plants owned by various State Governments. Cement industry in India has also made tremendous strides in technological up gradation and assimilation of latest technology. Presently, 93 per cent of the total capacity in the industry is based on modern and environment-friendly dry process technology. The induction of advanced technology has helped the industry immensely to conserve energy and fuel and to save materials substantially. Indian cement industry has also acquired technical capability to produce different types of cement like Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC), Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC), Portland Blast Furnace Slag Cement (PBFS), Oil Well Cement, Rapid Hardening Portland Cement, Sulphate Resisting Portland Cement, White Cement etc. Some of the major clusters of cement industry in India are: Satna (Madhya Pradesh), Chandrapur (Maharashtra), Gulbarga (Karnataka), Yerranguntla (Andhra Pradesh), Nalgonda (Andhra Pradesh), Bilaspur (Chattisgarh), and Chandoria (Rajasthan).

Cement industry in India is currently going through a consolidation phase. Some examples of consolidation in the Indian cement industry are: Gujarat Ambuja taking a stake of 14 per cent in ACC, and taking over DLF Cements and Modi Cement; ACC taking over IDCOL; India Cement taking over Raasi Cement and Sri Vishnu Cement; and Grasim's acquisition of the cement business of L&T, Indian Rayon's cement division, and Sri Digvijay Cements. Foreign cement companies are also picking up stakes in large Indian cement companies. Swiss cement major Holcim has picked up 14.8 per cent of the promoters' stake in Gujarat Ambuja Cements (GACL). Holcim's acquisition has led to the emergence of two major groups in the Indian cement industry, the Holcim-ACC-Gujarat Ambuja Cements combine and the Aditya Birla group through Grasim Industries and Ultratech Cement. Lafarge, the French cement major has acquired the cement plants of Raymond and Tisco. Italy based Italcementi has acquired a stake in the K.K. Birla promoted Zuari Industries' cement plant in Andhra Pradesh, and German cement company Heidelberg Cement has entered into an equal joint-venture agreement with S P Lohia Group controlled Indo-Rama Cement.


Project Report of Alcohol, Beer & Wine

Project Report of Alcohol, Beer & Wine

The Indian market for alcohol — mostly spirits and beer, as well as wine — totaled $14 billion last year, and was one of the fastest-growing alcohol markets in the world. Imports account for only a tiny fraction of that, but with India booming while demand elsewhere stalls, no international beverage company can afford to ignore it. Over the next five years, the Indian market for alcohol is projected to grow at 10% a year -more than in China, the U.S. and Europe combined, according to an estimate by KPMG India. "You've got a sizable population, a growing middle class, a growing economy," says Nigel Fair brass, a spokesman for SAB Miller, one of the world's largest brewers. "All of that is driving increasing consumption of alcohol products." India has grown into the largest whisky market by volume in the world, and the four biggest selling Indian brands sell more cases per year globally than the entire Scotch business combined
Whisky and India are intrinsically linked. Boasting the largest whisky market in the world by volume, India is also home to the world’s second largest distiller—Vijay Mallya - owned UB Group. Whisky making is serious business in India.

However, this was not always the case. Distillation of spirit was introduced to the country in a major way at the time of the British Raj, with entrepreneurs looking to satisfy the palate of the newly settled colonial communities with their own, Indian-made versions of whisky, gin, rum and vodka. These spirits became known in Asia as locally made foreign liquor and across India as Indian-made foreign liquor (IMFL). One example of distillation taking a foothold is the Kasauli distillery, the oldest continually used distillery in Asia, established in the late 1820s by a gentleman named Edward Dyer. Dyer brought his brewing and distilling equipment from England and Scotland with some of the original equipment, such as the copper pot stills—so important in spirit-making—still in use today. The location of the distillery was deliberate as Dyer was keen to find a place in India with a climate similar to that of Scotland, but with the added bonus of a market of British troops and civilians in Shimla and elsewhere in Punjab to sell his products to. As the appetite for homemade products grew, so did the production levels, and India now boasts of some of the largest selling liquor brands in the world. But if one is to travel internationally, he will rarely see these brands outside the country. So what has developed in the last 150 years for the average IMFL to have not found its way outside the home market; why is it so?

Sales of whisky have been on a steady incline for the past decade, with newer markets in the Far East, the Baltic states and South America helping to play a major role in reclaiming whisky from the domain of the snobs, or, indeed, the traditional image of the inebriated octogenarian sitting propping up the bar, nursing a tumbler of his favorite blend. Thanks to the huge popularity of TV series such as Mad Men and Boardwalk Empire, which feature a host of classic whisky cocktails (as well as some superbly sharp suits), mixing up a Whisky Sour or an Old Fashioned has helped the drink attract a more culturally aware audience, that is looking for a greater complexity of flavor in its favorite tipples. “The perception of whisky around the world has so many different views that the list is almost endless,” highlights George Grant, director of sales at the Glenfarclas distillery. “In Scotland, it is the national drink, whereas in India, it is almost a right or a ‘must have’ entitlement. In the USA, it is seen as something elusive, and the drink that signifies that yes…you have ‘made it’,” he continues. “But generally, whisky around the world is seen as something to aspire to.


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Project Report of Technology of Building Materials

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